Surrogacy Still a struggle for some Gay parents

Posted on: June 23rd, 2015 by Simple Surrogacy No Comments

Simple Surrogacy sees the facts and hears the horror stories every day for Intended Fathers who have tried other routes to surrogacy and been unsuccessful. It’s hard to see so many who just want to be parents struggle through the costs, difficulties and confusion surrounding surrogacy, both domestically and internationally. When Intended parents come to Simple Surrogacy, we try to educate them about their choices and options in a non biased way, while still presenting our program in a neutral light so that Parents can make a informed decision based on all the necessary facts and figures. Not everyone is as lucky as the Parents in the story below, who had a sister willing to carry for them in a surrogacy friendly state, but we hope that every match with Simple Surrogacy will feel like family when you match through us!  We are looking forward to helping many more Intended Parents through the confusing world of Surrogacy with our family friendly approach and competitive pricing. Call us today!

Gay dads turn to ‘hero’ sister in surrogacy struggle

Canadian laws make surrogacy especially difficult for gay male couples

By The Early Edition, CBC News Posted: Jun 17, 2015 4:12 PM PT Last Updated: Jun 18, 2015 2:48 PM PT

Craig Parkes (right) and Matthew Hinton were able to have their son, Fitzgerald, thanks to Matt's sister Laura agreeing to act as a surrogate.

Craig Parkes (right) and Matthew Hinton were able to have their son, Fitzgerald, thanks to Matt’s sister Laura agreeing to act as a surrogate. (CBC)

This Father’s Day, Craig Parkes and Matthew Hinton will have a new reason to celebrate family. Their son, Fitzgerald, was born earlier this year, and although he’s been more than a welcome addition, the road to his birth was anything but easy.

“It’s been a lengthy progress,” says Hinton. The couple originally attempted insemination with a surrogate in India, but without success. On top of that, while he was there, the country shut down surrogacy for gay parents.

The solution eventually arrived through a familiar face. Hinton’s sister Laura volunteered to be a surrogate for the couple. Although that solved the issue of who would carry the baby, they still required an egg donor, which was unavailable in Canada.

“We ended up having to go through an agency and actually compensate an egg donor, which you can’t do in Canada. So because Laura lives in South Carolina, it actually worked out for us,” says Hinton.

Since the birth of their son, Parkes and Hinton were approached by Tylenol to star in its newest commercial. Parkes says it was an opportunity to destigmatize gay couples having children. “I think the more people see regular couples with babies — whether they’re gay or straight — the more comfortable they are around it. I don’t think we set out to make a point or to change people’s minds, but looking back, it’s kind of inevitable that that’s a role we’re falling into.”

Unique challenge for gay parents

The entire process made clear to Hinton the difficulty for gay couples of trying to start a family.

He says there were few options available to them because many countries do not allow two male partners to adopt a baby. On top of that, Canadian laws add to the complication of using surrogacy.

“The issue for us is that there’s a ban in Canada on paying a surrogate. You can reimburse her, but you don’t know where that line is. You also can’t pay a woman to donate an egg to you. Realistically, for a gay couple you need have both,” he says.

The Vancouver couple refer to Laura as a hero for allowing them to start their own family. Laura says the decision came easy for her.

“Family is so important. It was a way to help a family member and I wouldn’t have it any other way.”


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